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The years prior to 2020 featured the pre-2020 Bering Sea cyclone seasons, seasons where cyclones were identified in the Bering Sea.

Pre-21st centuryEdit

1996 St. Lawrence Island cycloneEdit

A major extratropical cyclone with an estimated barometric pressure of 960 millibars (mbar) (28.35 inches of mercury (inHg) directly impacted St. Lawrence Island on November 3, 1996, killing two people and severely damaging the Northeast Cape Air Force Station. This was the first Bering Sea cyclone to be monitored by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC).

1999 St. Matthew Island cycloneEdit

Three years after the St. Lawrence Island cyclone, an even stronger extratropical cyclone with an estimated barometric pressure of 947 mbar (27.96 inHg) made a direct hit on St. Matthew Island during the afternoon of December 7, 1999. No impact was reported from the cyclone.

2000–01 to 2010-11 cyclone seasonsEdit

2001 Nome cycloneEdit

On April 2, 2001, an extratropical cyclone with a barometric pressure of 965 mbar (29.5 inHg) made landfall near Nome, Alaska. Winds of up to 130 miles per hour (mph) (210 kilometers per hour (km/h) toppled power lines and blew roofs off of an estimated 50 houses. Damage from the cyclone was estimated at $700,000 (2001 USD) and nine fatalities were reported.

2004 Diomede Islands cycloneEdit

An extratropical cyclone with an estimated barometric pressure of 952 mbar (28.11 inHg) made a direct hit over the Diomede Islands on February 11, 2004. In the city of Diomede, one house was destroyed by strong gusts; however, no fatalities or damage was reported from the cyclone.

2007 Sledge Island cycloneEdit

On July 6, 2007, an extratropical cyclone with a barometric pressure of 967 mbar (28.56 inHg) made a direct hit over Sledge Island and then made a landfall over the Seward Peninsula. Although no damage or human fatalities were reported from the cyclone, approximately 100 Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge sea otters were killed after they drowned in the Bering Sea because of strong gusts from the cyclone.

2011-12 to 2014-15 cyclone seasonsEdit

2011 Kamchatka Peninsula cycloneEdit

One of the most intense cyclones to ever affect the Kamchatka Peninsula made landfall on the peninsula's eastern coast on the morning of September 11, 2011 over Avacha Bay with a barometric pressure of 939 mbar (27.73 inHg). In the city of Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky, gusts of 143 mph (230 km/h) blew down stalls in the central market, grounded all shipping at the city seaport, toppled the statue of Vladimir Lenin in Lenin Square as well as the Tri Brata, and caused a seven foot storm surge from the Avacha River to indunate most of the city. Elsewhere, minimal impact was reported from the cyclone. Damage from the Kamchatka Peninsula cyclone is estimated at $400,000 (2011 USD) and 21 fatalities were reported from the system.

2013 Hagemeister Island cycloneEdit

A massive extratropical cyclone with a barometric pressure reading of 961 mbar (28.38 inHg)made a direct hit over Hagemeister Island on January 18, 2013. No impact was reported from the cyclone.

2014 King Island cycloneEdit

King Island was affected by an extratropical cyclone with a barometric pressure of 977 mbar (28.85 inHg) which made a direct hit on the island on April 18, 2014. Although no damages or fatalities were reported, the remnants of several abandoned Iñupiat towns were obliterated by wind gusts of up to 162 mph (261 km/h).

2015-16 Bering Sea cyclone seasonEdit

Beginning with the 2015-16 cyclone season, the JTWC began numbering all cyclones they tracked in the Bering Sea. Also, improved satellite technology enabled the agency to identify more storms than they previously could.

Three total cyclones were observed during the 2015-16 Bering Sea cyclone season.

Cyclone OneEdit

Category 1 tropical cyclone (JTWC)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration January 6 – January 7
Intensity 75 km/h (45 mph) (1-min),  997 mbar (hPa)

Cyclone One did not affect land.


Cyclone TwoEdit

Category 2 tropical cyclone (JTWC)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration February 12 – February 14
Intensity 95 km/h (60 mph) (1-min),  992 mbar (hPa)

Cyclone Two did not affect land.


Cyclone ThreeEdit

Category 1 tropical cyclone (JTWC)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration March 19 – March 20
Intensity 75 km/h (45 mph) (1-min),  998 mbar (hPa)

Cyclone Three did not affect land.


2016-17 Bering Sea cyclone seasonEdit

Beginning with this season, the JTWC began numbering all cyclones they tracked with a 'G' suffix.

Seven total cyclones were observed during the 2016-17 Bering Sea cyclone season.

Cyclone One-GEdit

Category 1 tropical cyclone (JTWC)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration November 9 – November 10
Intensity 65 km/h (40 mph) (1-min),  1001 mbar (hPa)

Cyclone One-G did not affect land.


Cyclone Two-G (Nemo)Edit

Tropical low (JTWC)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration February 7 – February 9
Intensity 55 km/h (35 mph) (1-min),  987 mbar (hPa)

Main article: Typhoon Nemo (2017)

The remnants of Pacific Typhoon Nemo entered the Bering Sea, causing no land effects.


Cyclone Three-GEdit

Category 1 tropical cyclone (JTWC)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration March 16 – March 19
Intensity 85 km/h (50 mph) (1-min),  995 mbar (hPa)

Cyclone Three-G did not affect land.


Cyclone Four-G (Rolf)Edit

Category 1 tropical cyclone (JTWC)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration May 2 – May 5
Intensity 85 km/h (50 mph) (1-min),  993 mbar (hPa)

Main article: Typhoon Rolf (2017)

The remnants of Pacific Typhoon Rolf entered the Bering Sea, bringing gusts of up to 44 mph (71 km/h) to the Aleutian Islands.


Cyclone Five-G (Tronje)Edit

Tropical low (JTWC)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration June 5 – June 5
Intensity 45 km/h (30 mph) (1-min),  1006 mbar (hPa)

Main article: Typhoon Tronje (2017)

The remnants of Pacific Typhoon Tronje entered the Bering Sea, causing no known land effects.


Cyclone Six-G (Valerian)Edit

Category 2 tropical cyclone (JTWC)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration June 26 – June 29
Intensity 100 km/h (65 mph) (1-min),  991 mbar (hPa)

Main article: Typhoon Valerian (2017)

The remnants of Pacific Typhoon Valerian entered the Bering Sea, bringing gusts of up to 47 mph (76 km/h) to the Aleutian Islands.


Cyclone Seven-G (Wilbur)Edit

Category 3 severe tropical cyclone (JTWC)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration June 27 – June 28
Intensity 120 km/h (75 mph) (1-min),  976 mbar (hPa)

Main article: Typhoon Wilbur (2017)

2017-18 Bering Sea cyclone seasonEdit

The remnants of Pacific Typhoon Wilbur entered the Bering Sea, bringing gusts of up to 51 mph (82 km/h) to the Aleutian Islands and 77 mph (124 km/h) to Nome, Alaska.


Beginning with the 2017-18 cyclone season, the JTWC began naming all systems it tracked that attained winds of at least 38 mph (61 km/h) using the Russian phonetic spelling alphabet. Also, starting with this season, the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) began issuing unofficial advisories on various Bering Sea systems they tracked.

Sixteen total cyclones were observed during the 2017-18 Bering Sea cyclone season, the highest total in any Bering Sea cyclone season.

Cyclone One-G (Yoda)Edit

Tropical low (JTWC)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration July 7 (Entered basin) – July 9
Intensity 55 km/h (35 mph) (1-min),  1006 mbar (hPa)

Main article: Typhoon Yoda (2017)

The remnants of Pacific Typhoon Yoda entered the Bering Sea, causing no land effects.


Cyclone Two-G (Hunter)Edit

Tropical low (JTWC)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration August 19 (Entered basin) – August 19
Intensity 35 km/h (25 mph) (1-min),  1011 mbar (hPa)

Main article: Tropical Storm Hunter (2017)

The remnants of Pacific Tropical Storm Hunter briefly entered the Bering Sea, causing no land effects.


Cyclone Three-G (Friedhelm)Edit

Tropical low (JTWC)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration August 25 (Entered basin) – August 27
Intensity 55 km/h (35 mph) (1-min),  997 mbar (hPa)

Main article: Typhoon Friedhelm (2017)

The remnants of Pacific Typhoon Friedhelm entered the Bering Sea, making a direct hit over St. Matthew Island and causing no known impact.


Cyclone Four-G (Leon)Edit

Category 2 tropical cyclone (JTWC)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration September 9 (Entered basin) – September 12
Intensity 95 km/h (60 mph) (1-min),  988 mbar (hPa)

Main article: Typhoon Leon (2017)

The remnants of Pacific Typhoon Leon entered the Bering Sea, bringing gusts of 34 mph (55 km/h) to Unalaska Island. One fatality was reported in Unalaska, Alaska from strong waves related to Leon's remnants.


Cyclone Five-G (Miekel)Edit

Tropical low (JTWC)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration September 17 (Entered basin) – September 18
Intensity 55 km/h (35 mph) (1-min),  995 mbar (hPa)

Main article: Typhoon Miekel (2017)

The remnants of Pacific Typhoon Miekel entered the Bering Sea, bringing gusts of up to 48 mph (77 km/h) to several of the Aleutian Islands.


Cyclone Six-G (Kurt)Edit

Category 1 tropical cyclone (JTWC)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration September 28 (Entered basin) – September 30
Intensity 65 km/h (40 mph) (1-min),  984 mbar (hPa)

Main article: Typhoon Kurt (2017)

The remnants of Pacific Typhoon Kurt entered the Bering Sea, capsizing a yacht and drowning its two passengers.


Cyclone Seven-G (Olaf)Edit

Tropical low (JTWC)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration September 29 (Entered basin) – September 29
Intensity 55 km/h (35 mph) (1-min),  986 mbar (hPa)

Main article: Typhoon Olaf (2017)

The remnants of Pacific Typhoon Olaf entered the Bering Sea. Before it caused any impact, it merged with the stronger remnants of Typhoon Kurt through a Fujiwhara interaction.


Cyclone Eight-G (Paolini)Edit

Category 1 tropical cyclone (JTWC)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration October 15 (Entered basin) – October 18
Intensity 85 km/h (50 mph) (1-min),  968 mbar (hPa)

Main article: Typhoon Paolini (2017)

The remnants of Pacific Typhoon Paolini entered the Bering Sea, making a landfall near the Cape Prince of Wales. Gusts of up to 85 mph (137 km/h) destroyed approximately 40 homes in Wales, causing three fatalities and $30,000 (2017 USD) in losses.


Cyclone Nine-G (Quinn)Edit

Category 4 severe tropical cyclone (JTWC)
Typhoon (JMA)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration October 19 (Entered basin) – October 26 (Exited basin)
Intensity 195 km/h (120 mph) (1-min),  924 mbar (hPa)

Main article: Typhoon Quinn (2017)

Pacific Typhoon Quinn's remnants entered the Bering Sea, making a landfall directly over Nome with winds of 110 mph (177 km/h) and a barometric pressure of 924 mbar (27.29 inHg). Gusts of up to 274 mph (441 km/h) in Nome, equivalent to that of an EF5 or F5 tornado, completely decimated nearly every structure in the city, shut off all electricity for 10 days, and killed nearly 500 people. Damage from Quinn's remnants totaled to $1.1 million (2017 USD), making it the costliest Bering Sea tropical cyclone on record. After exiting the Bering Sea, Typhoon Quinn's remnants progressed through the Eastern Pacific and the Atlantic Oceans before dissipating over Norway.


Cyclone Anna (Ten-G)Edit

Category 1 tropical cyclone (JTWC)
Tropical storm (JMA)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration October 21 – October 22
Intensity 75 km/h (45 mph) (1-min),  993 mbar (hPa)

Cyclone Anna, the first Bering Sea cyclone to be named using the Russian spelling phonetic alphabet, did not affect land. It was absorbed into the stronger remnants of Typhoon Quinn by a Fujiwhara interaction.


Cyclone Eleven-G (Sukru)Edit

Tropical low (JTWC)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration October 26 (Entered basin) – October 26
Intensity 55 km/h (35 mph) (1-min),  1004 mbar (hPa)

Main article: Typhoon Sukru (2017)

The remnants of Pacific Typhoon Sukru entered the Bering Sea, merging with Typhoon Quinn through a Fujiwhara interaction before causing any impact.


Cyclone Boris (Twelve-G)Edit

Category 1 tropical cyclone (JTWC)
Tropical storm (JMA)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration October 31 – November 2
Intensity 75 km/h (45 mph) (1-min),  991 mbar (hPa)

Cyclone Boris did not affect land.


Cyclone Thirteen-G (Ulli)Edit

Category 1 tropical cyclone (JTWC)
Tropical storm (JMA)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration November 9 (Entered basin) – November 12
Intensity 65 km/h (40 mph) (1-min),  957 mbar (hPa)

Main article: Typhoon Ulli (2017)

The remnants of Pacific Typhoon Ulli entered the Bering Sea, making a landfall near Wales, Alaska. Gusts of 76 mph (122 km/h) destroyed a further 30 homes that Paolini earlier in the season damaged and killed one person after a roof fell on his head.


Cyclone Vasily (Fourteen-G)Edit

Category 3 severe tropical cyclone (JTWC)
Tropical depression (JMA)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration November 19 – November 21
Intensity 120 km/h (75 mph) (1-min),  983 mbar (hPa)

Cyclone Vasily did not affect land.


Cyclone Gregory (Fifteen-G)Edit

Category 1 tropical cyclone (JTWC)
Tropical storm (JMA)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration February 15 – February 16
Intensity 65 km/h (40 mph) (1-min),  996 mbar (hPa)

Cyclone Gregory did not affect land.


Cyclone Dmitri (Sixteen-G)Edit

Category 1 tropical cyclone (JTWC)
Tropical depression (JMA)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration March 13 – March 14
Intensity 65 km/h (40 mph) (1-min),  998 mbar (hPa)

Cyclone Dmitri did not affect land.


2018-19 Bering Sea cyclone seasonEdit

Beginning with the 2018-19 Bering Sea cyclone season, the JTWC started implementing the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale (SSHS) when describing a storm's intensity.

Four total cyclones were observed during the 2018-19 Bering Sea cyclone season.

Cyclone YelenaEdit

Tropical storm (JTWC)
Tropical storm (JMA)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration January 4 – January 5
Intensity 85 km/h (50 mph) (1-min),  986 mbar (hPa)

Cyclone Yelena did not affect land.


Cyclone ZhenyaEdit

Tropical storm (JTWC)
Tropical depression (JMA)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration February 27 – February 27
Intensity 65 km/h (40 mph) (1-min),  984 mbar (hPa)

Cyclone Zhenya did not affect land.


Cyclone ZinaidaEdit

Tropical storm (JTWC)
Tropical depression (JMA)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration March 7 – March 8
Intensity 65 km/h (40 mph) (1-min),  995 mbar (hPa)

Cyclone Zinaida did not affect land.


Cyclone IvanEdit

Tropical storm (JTWC)
Tropical storm (JMA)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration March 16 – March 19
Intensity 95 km/h (60 mph) (1-min),  993 mbar (hPa)

Cyclone Ivan brought waves of up to 15 feet (4.572 meters) along the majority of the Kamchatka Peninsula's eastern coast; however, damage was minimal.


2019-20 Bering Sea cyclone seasonEdit

Starting with the 2019-20 cyclone season, the JTWC switched from using 1-minute sustained winds to 10-minute sustained winds in their cyclone advisories, but the agency continued using 1-minute sustained wind data in their preliminary reports.

Seven total cyclones were observed during the 2019-20 Bering Sea cyclone season.

Cyclone KonstatinEdit

Tropical storm (JTWC)
Severe tropical storm (JMA)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration February 19 – Februrary 22
Intensity 100 km/h (65 mph) (10-min),  987 mbar (hPa)

Cyclone Konstatin made a direct hit over Little Diomede Island, killing one person.


Cyclone LeonidEdit

Tropical storm (JTWC)
Tropical depression (JMA)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration February 21 – February 21
Intensity 55 km/h (35 mph) (10-min),  998 mbar (hPa)

Cyclone Leonid did not affect land.


Cyclone MikhailEdit

Tropical storm (JTWC)
Tropical storm (JMA)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration February 26 – February 26
Intensity 85 km/h (50 mph) (10-min),  992 mbar (hPa)

Cyclone Mikhail did not affect land.


Cyclone NikolaiEdit

Category 5 super typhoon (JTWC)
Typhoon (JMA)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration April 2 – April 9
Intensity 220 km/h (140 mph) (10-min),  907 mbar (hPa)

Cyclone Nikolai was regarded as one of the worst natural disasters to ever affect the Kamchatka Peninsula by local citizens. The raging cyclone slammed into the Kamchatka Peninsula at its peak intensity before trekking into Siberia. Gusts of up to 217 mph (349 km/h) flattened entire forests and caused major snowstorms around most of northeastern Russia. Luckily, Nikolai avoided most of the Kamchatka Peninsula's major urban settlements. Consequently, only $1,000 (2020 USD) in damage was caused and just three fatalities were reported after a group of explorers were crushed by falling trees in a forest. Nikolai's effects on the Kamchatka Peninsula were compounded by Cyclone Olga only a few days afterwards.


Cyclone OlgaEdit

Category 4 super typhoon (JTWC)
Typhoon (JMA)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration April 3 – April 11
Intensity 215 km/h (130 mph) (10-min),  905 mbar (hPa)

Cyclone Olga added on to Cyclone Nikolai's misery. A Fujiwhara effect between Nikolai and Olga steered Olga directly over the Kamchatka Peninsula's major cities, causing major devastation. Gusts of up to 234 mph (377 km/h) severely damaged regions still recovering from the 2011 Kamchatka Peninsula cyclone. Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky was decimated a second time, as structures that had survived the 2011 cyclones were crushed by Olga, such as the Temple of the Sacred Trinity. Further north, in Yelizovo, many were unprepared for the cyclones, and as a result, 90% of the infrastructure in the city was damaged beyond repair. Another city that took serious damage was Palana. Electricity was suspended for 15 days, and water services became very limited. Overall, Olga caused 1,457 fatalities and $1.6 million (2020 USD) in damage, making it the costliest Kamchatka Peninsula tropical cyclone on record. Recovery from Nikolai and Olga took up to 25 years in some regions.


Cyclone PavelEdit

Tropical depression (JTWC)
Tropical depression (JMA)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration April 6 – April 6
Intensity 35 km/h (25 mph) (10-min), ≤ 1001 mbar (hPa)

Cyclone Pavel did not affect land. It was absorbed into Cyclones Nikolai and Olga thorough a double Fujiwhara interaction.


Cyclone RomanEdit

Category 5 super typhoon (JTWC)
Typhoon (JMA)
Counterclockwise vortex
Duration April 6 – April 10
Intensity 240 km/h (150 mph) (10-min),  886 mbar (hPa)

Cyclone Roman made a direct hit over Nome and caused colossal devestation rivaling that of 2017's Ex-Typhoon Quinn. Ninety-nine percent of the city's infrastructure was decimated by gusts of 301 mph (484 km/h) and a storm surge of 20 feet (6.1 meters), leaving nearly 4,000 citizens homeless and suspending gas, electricity, and water services for almost three weeks. Further north, many tribes in northern Alaska were killed from lack of food or water due to Roman's fierce gusts. The impact reached all the way to Barrow, where homes built on pilings collapsed and a storm surge of nine feet (2.7 meters) flooded most of the city. Overall, damage from Roman is estimated at $500,000 (2020 USD) and 1,789 fatalities were reported.

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